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HAMILTON In Flanders Fields | FRANCK Panis Angelicus Pièce Héroïque, for organ | FOUHY New work | GRANT New work | YSAŸE Violin Sonata in E minor, op 27 | DURUFLÉ Requiem Op 9 for choir, soprano, baritone, cello and organ

 

 

With this wide-ranging concert featuring music of peace and remembrance, Auckland Choral honours those 18,000 New Zealand casualties — including 5000 who died — a hundred years ago in the horror of the Ypres front line around Passchendaele. 

Music by Belgian, French and New Zealand composers will be performed, including the calm Requiem by French composer Maurice Duruflé, works by the Belgian-born César Franck, and a moving solo sonata by Belgian violinist-composer Eugène Ysaÿe.

Musical tributes from New Zealanders will feature a work by David Hamilton and new music on the theme of peace by young composers Sarah Fouhy and Lachlan Grant, first and second prizewinners respectively in the 2016 APO Student Composers competition.

Morag Atchison Soprano

Christopher Tonkin Baritone

Andrew Beer Violin

James Bush Cello

John Wells Organ

Paul Chan Piano

Morag Atchison Soprano

Christopher Tonkin Baritone

Auckland Choral

Elizabeth Lau Conductor

Uwe Grodd Conductor

 

 

 

Sunday 28 May 5.00pm

St Matthew-in-the-City 

 

 

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Who we are: Get to know some of our choir members

  • Beverley Rogers

    Picture of Beverley RogersA singing member of Auckland Choral for 12 years, Beverley has enjoyed a lifetime of involvement in the performing arts and has sung with many choirs throughout New Zealand.  She has the choir’s best interests at heart, and as Chair of the Management Committee is committed to its success to offer performances of excellence and to bringing choral music to the wider community of the Auckland region both now and in the future.

    Beverley’s commitment to community service over the years has extended across a wide spectrum having served on and chaired a number of charitable organisations trusts.

     
  • Alison Miller

    Picture of Alison MillerHi, I’m Alison Miller. I have been singing all my life, as both my parents had good voices, and we followed in their footsteps. I’ve sung in both church and community choirs, but when I was a pupil in the EGGS choir, we sang the third chorus part in St Matthew Passion in the Town Hall with Ray Wilson conducting and I was smitten. Years later when we returned to Auckland, and heard Auckland Choral singing Brubeck’s Light in the Wilderness in 1969, I knew I had to belong to this magnificent choir.. I joined in 1970 as a soprano 1, and have been a member since then, with the first concert being Walton’s Belshazzar’s Feast, with 6 weeks rehearsal time.
    Various committee positions have kept me involved, and I was secretary (in those days - a very basic General Manager) for 7 years, before taking on the Librarian’s position. I was very proud to see our daughter Sandy join Choral while she was still at school, and when I joined the alto line I remember her moral support for me as a new alto. Auckland Choral is my life and the members are my music family, which I am very conscious of every time we perform on stage. Unfortunately I have had to take leave on several occasions because of ill health, but one positive to that is I’ve been in the audience to witness the choir’s great presentations from in front of the stage.

    Away from choir and family, I take a team of handbell ringers who meet each week in East Auckland.

     
  • Sandy Bulmer

    Picture of Sandy BulmerLike so many contraltos, I first got put in the alto section as a school girl because I could read music and manage to sing a line of harmony. I joined Auckland Choral when I was in high school and now I’ve been a member for 40 years! I started singing with my mum as a toddler, sitting on her knee while she played the piano and sang soprano and tenor Messiah arias. I used to come to Auckland Choral’s Saturday dress rehearsals in the Town Hall and follow the score in my early teenage years, and it was a natural step to join Mum in the choir when I was 15. I remember Choral Hall in Airedale Street where we used to meet (before Mayoral Drive was built). It was a dusty old building and freezing in winter, but the ladies in the alto section were very kind to me and welcomed me into the back row. Nothing really changes in that respect; the Auckland Choral altos today are a great bunch of people as well!

     
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